Tuesday, Jul 22nd

You are here Blog
Share: 

Future Agricultures blog

Opinion and comment from Future Agricultures researchers on agricultural politics, science and society in Africa.

Blog entries categorized under Hot topic

Hot topic

Subscribe to feed 211 posts in this category

17 July: China and Brazil in African agriculture - news roundup

by Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Thursday, 17 July 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

China_brazilflagsThis news roundup has been collected on behalf of the China and Brazil in African Agriculture (CBAA) project.

For regular updates from the
project, sign up to the CBAA newsletter.

China’s New White Paper on Foreign Aid

China’s second white paper on foreign aid has been published, wherein China is shown to have provided RMB 89.34 billion in the three years from 2010-2012. The report includes sections on agriculture and environmental protection and the blog below provides an interesting analysis of the report.

Chinese Ambassador to Tanzania criticises Chinese migrants

China’s ambassador to Tanzania, Lu Youqing, gave an interview to Southern Metropolis Daily, in which he talks of the positives that China has brought to the country, such as adding 150,000 jobs locally, and becoming the country’s biggest trading partner. However, he talks of the difficulties with the Chinese migrants that have come to the country and had pejorative dealings with local government officials and others that fail to respect the local laws.
(Southern Metropolis Daily)

China Zimbabwe hybrid rice project

Zimbabwe’s Ministry of Agriculture and a local private consultation firm have signed a Memorandum of Understanding with China’s National Hybrid Rice Research and Development Center to start a pilot hybrid rice production project. A team of Chinese technical experts are due to visit Zimbabwe in the third week of July to plan the project. The local firm is tasked with providing land, labour, logistical support and seek government support.
(Oryza.com)

Tags: cbaa-roundup
Read More Hits: 72
0 votes

The EU-Brazil partnership on development: a lukewarm affair

by Nathan Oxley
Nathan Oxley
Nathan Oxley has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Monday, 14 July 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

Lidia Cabral, researcher with our China & Brazil in African Agriculture project, has written a policy brief for the think tank FRIDE assessing the limited success of the EU-Brazil strategic partnership on international development.

In particular, the brief identifies problems with a ‘North/South’ discourse which persists in spite of the changing dynamics of power and influence across continents.

From the brief:

“Much of the debate is infused by a discourse that, by juxtaposing ‘North’ versus ‘South’ and ‘traditional’ versus ‘emerging’ players, places Brazil and the EU on opposing sides. Yet, there are opportunities to build alliances around specific thematic issues, such as the global fight against hunger. With regard to trilateral cooperation, the analysis reveals a mismatch between high-level pledges and motivations on the one hand and on-the- ground operational capacity on the other. It also shows a fading emphasis on this modality of engagement. There is still scope, nonetheless, for joint learning on trilateral cooperation.”

The EU-Brazil partnership on development: a lukewarm affair (FRIDE website)

Tags: Untagged
Read More Hits: 339
0 votes

A culture of extraction and exclusion: How philanthropy impoverishes the vulnerable

by Nathan Oxley
Nathan Oxley
Nathan Oxley has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Friday, 11 July 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

maintenance-zambia

by Rebecca Pointer, Information and Communications Officer, Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies (PLAAS)

Well-intentioned people the world over see transformation to green ways of doing as absolutely essential. Many argue that by switching to green ways of doing, we can have win-win situations in which we tackle both environmental degradation and poverty, through innovative projects and by conserving wild areas where there still exist.

Yet at the Green Economy in the South conference, which took place from 8-10 July in Dodoma, Tanzania, case study after case study has showed how the language and practices of switching to ‘green’ result in the extraction of resources from Africa to the North, from the poor to the wealthy, all under the guise of philanthropy and development. Processes funded by Northern development agencies, such as REDD+, result in capital accumulating more by dispossessing Africans, enclosing African land, and selling ecological services to the wealthy few who can afford the high price tag.

Tags: Untagged
Read More Hits: 91
0 votes

Missionary discourses: can the green economy bring climate justice to the South?

by Joanes Odiwuor Atela
Joanes Odiwuor Atela
Joanes Odiwuor Atela has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Friday, 11 July 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

French missionaries in Africa, c.1930

The green economy has become one of the most powerful political and social agendas in the era of climate change. This week, researchers have met in Dodoma, Tanzania at the Green Economy in the South conference – the first meeting of its kind. Central to this green economy is the emergence of carbon market mechanisms as a form of green development for climate change mitigation and adaptation.

The carbon phenomenon has attracted a variety of multilateral and bilateral investments from the North to the South, with the premise that it represents a form of climate justice for the states and local communities who could participate in these schemes. But in academic and political debates on green economy, questions have been raised as to what extent these carbon schemes – as part of the green economy – represent realistic climate justice to climatically vulnerable farmers and pastoralists in the South.

Specific cases of carbon schemes in Ghana (Vision 2050 carbon project), Zimbabwe (Kariba REDD project) and Kenya (the Kenya Agricultural Carbon Project) indicate that these schemes, in their designs, perpetuate a generic discourse around ‘ecological and social missionary’. In this discourse, projects claim to bring a new life to the ecosystem and livelihoods in the respective target localities that are now suffering the impacts of global change.

Tags: climate change, carbon, redd+
Read More Hits: 451
0 votes

Why we should care about developing a Green Economy in the global South

by Emmanuel Sulle
Emmanuel Sulle
Emmanuel Sulle has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Monday, 07 July 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

Algeria-solar

The importance of developing a green economy – mostly referred to as “an economy where economic prosperity can go hand-in-hand with the ecological sustainability” (PDF) – in the global South cannot be overstated. Studies indicate that with the basic economic system in place, using less carbon intensive technologies, less developed countries (LDCs) are better placed to go green than developed countries, which have to retire the old fossil fuels dependent facilities/technologies.

The transition to a green economy is, however, not an easy task. The constraints include lack of capital, technologies, policies, and legal and institutional frameworks that would enable and regulate private sector investments in the green economy. Yet the wealthiest Northerners, sometimes in collusion with local elites, are seizing opportunities associated with green economies – in many cases with negative impacts for surrounding communities and vulnerable groups in the global South.

Early studies into biofuels developments, for example, indicate that rural communities especially find limits placed on their access to, ownership and control over resources.

Understanding how these initiatives work, and their consequences, has motivated scholars from all over the world to attend the Green Economy in the South conference, which starts tomorrow in Tanzania. With a wide range of questions and cases covered, the conference will steer a lively debate in search for answers, recommendations and cruxes on how these issues can be dealt with.

Tags: GM crops, land, climate change, Tanzania, green economy, green economy
Read More Hits: 115
0 votes

7 July: China and Brazil in African agriculture - news roundup

by Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Monday, 07 July 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

China_brazilflagsThis news roundup has been collected on behalf of the China and Brazil in African Agriculture (CBAA) project.

For regular updates from the
project, sign up to the CBAA newsletter.

Zimbabwe to Follow Brazilian model of ethanol fuel blending

Zimbabwe’s Agriculture and Rural Development Authority board chairman Mr Basil Nyabadza has said that his country would move from the use of an E15 ethanol blend to an E85 ethanol blend in their cars, to cut down on imported fossil fuels (the number refers to the percentage of ethanol versus petrol). The chairman accepted that some car manufactures will have to readjust, but affirmed that “Zimbabwe has the same opportunity as Brazil to develop a dynamic biofuel industry to serve not only its own fuel needs but the region as well.”
(Manica Post)

Zimbabwe’s Alliance of Anhui-based investors grows

The Alliance of Anhui-Based Investors was established last year and has since then facilitated 37 Anhui companies’ engagement in Zimbabwean markets, with investment contracts worth $17m. These contracts have been signed with business and government leaders, and agriculture is listed as one of the areas of cooperation.
(Anhui News)

Zimbabwe’s tobacco sales exceed expectations

“The sales of tobacco in Zimbabwe reached 190 million kg, which has surpassed this year’s target of 180 million kg, as the country’s 2014 tobacco auction marketing season will end soon, the Tobacco Industry and Marketing Board (TIMB) announced Thursday.” This was sold for $604.7m and compares with 166m kg sold in 2013 for $616m. The article cites China as Zimbabwe’s biggest buyer of tobacco.
(Coastweek.com)

Tags: cbaa-roundup
Read More Hits: 220
0 votes

25 June: China and Brazil in African agriculture - news roundup

by Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Wednesday, 25 June 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

China_brazilflagsThis news roundup has been collected on behalf of the China and Brazil in African Agriculture (CBAA) project.

For regular updates from the
project, sign up to the CBAA newsletter.

China’s sovereign wealth fund shifts focus to agriculture

“China’s sovereign wealth fund is shifting its focus to invest in agriculture and global food supplies in a significant strategic move that reflects the priorities of the country’s new leadership.” The China Investment Corporation (CIC) will focus on irrigation, land transformation and animal feed production among other areas across value chains. CIC has roughly $650bn of assets under management of $200bn is invested outside the country. Alongside this article in the Financial Times, the Chairman of CIC has had a blog published with his own commentary on the news entitled ‘China will profit from feeding the world’s appetite’.

World Food Programme explains Brazil’s PAA (Purchase from Africans for Africa) Programme in Ethiopia

Further to last week’s mention of the Purchase from Africans for Africa programme in Ethiopia, this article on the World Food Programme’s (WFP) website gives a more detailed report on what is expected. Aiming to benefit 10,000 people, the programme is receiving support from the WFP and the FAO. It is expected that 37,500 metric tons of local grains will be purchased as part of the programme.
(World Food Programme)

Tags: cbaa-roundup
Read More Hits: 297
0 votes

IFAMA 2014: Is Africa's future 'upstream' and 'post-farm'?

by Nathan Oxley
Nathan Oxley
Nathan Oxley has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Tuesday, 24 June 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

By Amelia Genis, PhD student, Institute of Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies (PLAAS)

African agriculture is the next frontier for local and global agricultural services and input companies. Here, we are told, the "underutilised" land and water resources are enormous, and agricultural productivity so low that it translates into massive potential for new markets and scope for profit.

I attended IFAMA's (International Food and Agribusiness Management Association) "Agribusiness & Food World Forum" on 17-19 June 2014 in Cape Town, held for the first time in Africa.

The forum programme states that Africa's agriculture and agribusiness future has "soared to the top of the world's most elite economic growth and development agendas" and that this "heightened attention" on agriculture and agribusiness in Africa is based on the fact that her enormous growth potential, "now tangibly in sight, hinges on expanding the capacity of these industries".

Tags: Untagged
Read More Hits: 291
0 votes

Sustainable intensification: a new buzzword to feed the world?

by Ian Scoones
Ian Scoones
Ian Scoones has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Thursday, 19 June 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

The term ‘sustainable intensification(SI) has entered academic and policy discourse in recent years, including in debates about what to do about agriculture in Zimbabwe. I have been intrigued for some while to find out what it actually means. Is this yet another contradictory hyphenation of two words for political ends, or does it have some substance? Who is driving this debate, and what does it mean for Africa?

A flurry of publications have been produced in the past year or two that use the term, and they provide a good route to finding out a bit more. A high profile article in Science from 2013 offered a definition of SI: “to increase food production from existing farmland in ways that place far less pressure on the environment and that do not undermine our capacity to continue producing food in the future”. The major Montpellier Panel report offer a similar one, defining SI as “producing more outputs with more efficient use of all inputs on a durable basis, while reducing environmental damage and building resilience, natural capital and the flow of environmental services”. Other similar formulations appear in a recent Royal Society collection of papers. No one could disagree with these it seems. Is SI then just what we used to call sustainable agriculture, or is there something more to it?

Tags: Untagged
Read More Hits: 458
0 votes

16 June: China and Brazil in African agriculture - news roundup

by Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Monday, 16 June 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

China_brazilflagsThis news roundup has been collected on behalf of the China and Brazil in African Agriculture (CBAA) project.

For regular updates from the
project, sign up to the CBAA newsletter.

‘Estimating China’s Foreign Aid 2001-2013’

A new working paper by Naohiro Kitano and Yuiknori Harada at JICA has published revised estimates of China’s current aid disbursements. However, they have also presented the data in such a way that it allows a direct comparison with ODA net disbursements according to DAC definitions which has not been done before. The results suggest that net aid totalled $7.1bn in 2013 and that if placed within the list of DAC countries, then China moved from being the 16th biggest donor in 2001, to the 6th biggest donor in 2013. The results are based upon mixture of publically available data and informed estimates.

Forthcoming Brazil-Africa agricultural research agenda published

The Agricultural Innovation MKTPlace programme that forms research collaborations between African institutions and Brazil (usually EMBRAPA) has published the preliminary list of research projects and partnerships for the coming year.
(Agricultural Innovation MKTPlace)

Brazilian support for small-scale farming in Africa

Brazil’s ambassador to Ethiopia claims that the PAA programme (Purchase from Africans for Africa / Programa de Aquisição de Alimentos) been successful for smallholder farmers in the 5 countries it currently operates in: Ethiopia, Mozambique, Malawi, Niger and Senegal. She announced that there were plans to expand the programme in Ethiopia, which currently operates mainly in the south of the country.
(AllAfrica)

Tags: cbaa-roundup
Read More Hits: 89
0 votes

GM crops: continuing controversy

by Ian Scoones
Ian Scoones
Ian Scoones has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Monday, 16 June 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

GM Crops

In 2002, the international press was full of headlines such as ‘Starving Zimbabwe Shuns GM Maize’. This was repeated again in 2010. The context was the refusal to import whole-grain GM maize from South Africa, as regulatory approval had not been granted, and there were fears that the food aid grain would be planted when GM crops had not been approved for release by the national regulatory authorities. The 2002 episode in particular caused a massive furore, with the governments of Zambia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique cast as villains, at odds with the needs of their people.

The debate has re-emerged recently with calls from a number of quarters, including the CZI and CFU, for Zimbabwe to accept the inevitable and formally approve the planting of GM crops. Of course GM crops, and especially maize, are planted widely as so much maize grain has been imported through informal routes from South Africa in recent years. An official acceptance of GM crops would, it is argued, increase productivity, reduce food aid dependence and tackle poverty. GM for some is the silver tech bullet that Zimbabwe urgently needs.

The Zimbabwe debate, not surprisingly, almost exactly replicates the international discussion that has heated up recently too. In the UK a group of science advisors to the Prime Minister have recently reported their view that the UK should lift its moratorium. The UK Chief Scientist, Sir Mark Walport, argued in his covering letter that ‘people will go unfed’ if such a response was not forthcoming. Some extreme press coverage, including in the normally restrained Sunday broadsheet, the Observer, has backed the advisors, with claims that such a move would help solve the global food crisis and world poverty. A similar narrative is being pushed by some commentators in a debate this week convened by SciDev.net.

Tags: GM crops, GM crops
Read More Hits: 257
0 votes

4 June: China and Brazil in African Agriculture - news roundup

by Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Wednesday, 04 June 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

China_brazilflagsThis news roundup has been collected on behalf of the China and Brazil in African Agriculture (CBAA) project.

For regular updates from the
project, sign up to the CBAA newsletter.

China provides grant for Agricultural development in the Maldives

China has provided 1mil RMB ($160,000) grant aid to the Maldives for it to develop its agricultural sector. This appears to be intended for research among other activities related to the Maldives agricultural sector specifically, but there are few details at present.
(Miadhu.com)

Does Fairtrade work?

This four-year research project conducted in Ethiopia and Uganda to understand how global trade in agricultural commodities affects the lives of the poor in Africa, especially through wage employment. They have just published some of their findings from this research that show how those working on fair-trade farms are often paid less than those on large-scale farming operations, who can afford to pay more and give more stable employment.
(The Guardian / Project homepage)

Tags: cbaa-roundup
Read More Hits: 122
0 votes

Are livestock destroying the planet?

by Ian Scoones
Ian Scoones
Ian Scoones has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Monday, 02 June 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

garissa1Livestock are essential to rural economies and livelihoods across Africa. On Zimbabweland there have been many blogs on this theme focusing on Zimbabwe’s livestock and marketing systems. But are these animals contributing to planetary destruction through greenhouse gas emissions?

A special issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on livestock and global change late last year offered some new data, and generated a minor storm of controversy thanks in large part to the Economist weighing into the debate. The Economists’ summary of a paper by Mario Herrero from CSIRO in Australia and colleagues from IIASA and ILRI suggested that the solution to the high climate change impacts of traditional livestock rearing was to abandon free range pastoralism and shift to a form of intensive factory farming. The answer The Economist believes is “intensive livestock farming, which is more efficient and environmentally friendlier than small-scale, traditional pastoralism of the sort beloved by many greens”. Why is this position adopted? The Economist explains:

… More acres are given over to feeding animals than to any other single use. Meat accounts for a sixth of humanity’s calorific intake but uses roughly a third of its crop land, water and grain. Producing a kilogram of grain takes 1,500 litres of water; a kilo of beef takes 15,000 litres. A fifth of the world’s pasture has been spoilt by overgrazing….livestock farming produces 8-18% of greenhouse-gas emissions. It is the main contributor to the build-up of nitrogen and phosphorus in the world’s soils, producing too much ammonia (which is caustic), nitrous oxide (a greenhouse gas) and dead zones in oceans (the result of excess phosphorus). A fifth of the world’s pasture has been spoilt by overgrazing….

Extensive livestock production it seems is bad news. This was in part the argument of the FAO’s controversial book from 2006, Livestock’s Long Shadow. And it has been picked up by many since, including another FAO publication published recently that provided a rather more rounded perspective than its predecessor. So should Zimbabwe and other countries in Africa be abandoning livestock production to save the planet? Are intensive systems of ‘factory farming’ the answer?

Tags: Untagged
Read More Hits: 403
0 votes

29 May: China and Brazil in African Agriculture - news roundup

by Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Thursday, 29 May 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments
China_brazilflagsThis news roundup has been collected on behalf of the China and Brazil in African Agriculture (CBAA) project.

For regular updates from the
project, sign up to the CBAA newsletter.

IESE evicted; Carlos Nuno Castel-Branco interviewed by officials

On Monday 12 May, the Instituto de Estudos Sociais e Economicos (IESE), our project partners in Mozambique, were handed an eviction notice. More recently Prof Carlos Castel-Branco was interviewed on 26 May by one of Maputo city’s attorney generals. He has not been arrested or charged.
(AllAfrica / Change.org)

Brazil rules out aid for Zimbabwean programme

Brazil’s ambassador to Zimbabwe has ruled out financial support for an economic programme called the Zimbabwe Agenda for Sustainable Socio-Economic Transformation (ZimAsset). Marca Maro da Silva said that “As a rule, Brazil does not give any support to sovereign nations and we don’t give out hand-outs either.” Furthermore, she added that the country is too wealthy to be asking for help and what it needed most was investment. The article also quotes the outgoing Chinese ambassador on the issue of future loans being securitised against mineral resources.
(Zimbabwe Situtation)

China’s $2bn multilateral investment

China is investing $2bn into the African Development Bank to start the “Africa Growing Together Fund”. This fund intends to fund contracts from the most suitable bidders, irrelevant of whether they are from China or not which has been described as a departure from previous practice by the Financial Times. On her blog, Deborah Brautigam followed up on this story.
(Financial Times / Deborah Brautigam’s blog)

Tags: Untagged
Read More Hits: 328
0 votes

Malawi's agriculture subsidies: book launch, London, 29 May

by Nathan Oxley
Nathan Oxley
Nathan Oxley has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Tuesday, 27 May 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

malawi-bookThe book Agricultural Input Subsidies: the Recent Malawi Experience will be launched in London this Thursday, at an event with the book's authors and other eminent commentators on this important issue.

Speakers: Professor Andrew Dorward, Professor of Development Economics, SOAS; His Excellency Bernard Sande, Malawi High Commissioner; Dr Zoltan Tiba, Oxford Policy Management; Dr Steve Wiggins, Research Fellow, Overseas Development Institute (ODI). Chair: Professor Thandika Mkandawire, Department of International Development, London School of Economics

Date & Time: Thursday, 29 May, 7-9PM (register online to attend)
Venue: Khalili Lecture Theatre, School of Oriental & African Studies (SOAS), London WC1H 0XG

Tags: Malawi
Read More Hits: 153
0 votes

Mourning the death of Professor Kwadwo Asenso-Okyere

by George Kwadzo
George Kwadzo
George Kwadzo has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Wednesday, 21 May 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

asenso-okyere1Future Agricultures joins family, friends, and colleagues in mourning the late Professor Kwadwo Asenso-Okyere, a member of our International Advisory Council. Prof Asenso-Okyere passed away while on a recent mission in Mongolia.

He was a former Director of the Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research (ISSER), which hosts the West Africa regional hub of Future Agricultures.

Tags: Untagged
Read More Hits: 437
0 votes

The Graduation and Social Protection conference: What did we learn?

by Stephen Devereux
Stephen Devereux
Stephen Devereux has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Tuesday, 20 May 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

The Graduation and Social Protection conference closed in Kigali on Thursday 8 May, with a series of 46 ‘Learning Insights and Action Points’ distilled from the 10 sessions.  (These will be posted on the conference website soon.)

Key conclusions included the following:
Tags: Untagged
Read More Hits: 148
0 votes

Peasants & Politics: new free articles from the Journal of Peasant Studies

by Nathan Oxley
Nathan Oxley
Nathan Oxley has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Wednesday, 30 April 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments

JPS coverA new Journal of Peasant Studies special issue focusing on Peasants & Politics is out now, part of the JPS’s series celebrating its 40th anniversary.

This new collection highlights some of the key articles that have been published in the journal over the past four decades on peasant politics. The articles are free to access from the JPS website until 31 December 2014.

From the website:

“The articles share one common feature: they all remain extremely relevant, especially in the context of today’s massive, worldwide revival of critical agrarian studies. We hope academics will find the virtual special issue useful in their courses. We hope students of contemporary critical agrarian studies and critical environmental studies, among others, will find it useful in building their theoretical foundations. We hope policy practitioners will find it relevant in informing policy debates. We hope agrarian, food and environmental activists will find it relevant in their political struggles.”

 

Tags: land
Read More Hits: 538
0 votes

'African Farmer': more than just a game

by John Thompson
John Thompson
John Thompson has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Monday, 28 April 2014 Category Hot topic 2 Comments

http://www.future-agricultures.org/images/stories/family-for-mailch.jpg

Development of Africa’s smallholder agriculture sector and the introduction and application of new technologies and practices are critical for reducing rural poverty, improving economic growth and enhancing human welfare across the region. Yet there is also a clear need for a new vision for agricultural development that can guide these efforts, while responding to the dynamics of agrarian change in Africa’s complex farming environments.

But whose vision should this be? How can risk and uncertainty be dealt with effectively? How can issues of gender, equity and social inclusion be taken into consideration in the design and implementation of these new initiatives? How can the ‘hardware’ of agricultural science and technology be linked to the ‘software’ of more democratic and effective institutions and policy processes? How should new investments in agricultural research and development be governed so that they benefit smallholder women and men farmers, who represent the vast majority of Africa’s agricultural producers?

While reflecting on these questions, I recognised that my colleagues and I could conduct new research, write more papers and books and share our findings and recommendations with development professionals and decision-makers in Africa and elsewhere, but these were unlikely to provide the kinds of insights that would confront their biases and raise awareness about the real opportunities and challenges facing Africa’s small farmers. Instead, I thought, ‘What if we tried something radically different, something that was both highly entertaining and deeply compelling, something that drew people in and allowed them to experience (vicariously, at least) the trade-offs and challenges faced by Africa’s producers on a daily basis? A computer-based simulation, perhaps?’

Tags: Untagged
Read More Hits: 668
0 votes

15 April: China and Brazil in African agriculture - news roundup

by Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat
Henry Tugendhat has not set their biography yet
User is currently offline
Tuesday, 15 April 2014 Category Hot topic 0 Comments
China_brazilflagsThis news roundup has been collected on behalf of the China and Brazil in African Agriculture (CBAA) project.

For regular updates from the
project, sign up to the CBAA newsletter.

New articles on Chinese involvements in African agriculture

This month’s edition of GREAT insights magazine from the European Centre for Development Policy Management has a focus on China-Africa engagements, including several articles looking at agriculture in particular. This includes pieces by CBAA researchers, Kojo Amanor and Dawit Alemu.
Rising powers: new articles

Respect Labour Laws, Chinese Told

‘The Chinese Federation of Zimbabwe’ was recently launched to defend the business and social interests of Chinese migrants in the country. Local government minister Ignatius Chombo spoke on behalf of Joice Mujuru to praise relations between Zimbabwe and China but also advise the group that they should be careful to observe labour laws and professional standards.
(New Zimbabwe)

Tags: cbaa-roundup
Read More Hits: 404
0 votes