Thursday, Jul 31st

You are here Publications Publication by theme Climate Change
Share: 
Climate Change
Search Keyword: Total 40 results found.
Tag: Climate Change Ordering

By Yohannes GebreMichael,Saidou Magagi,Wolfgang Bayer & Ann Waters-Bayer

An exploratory study was made in Ethiopia and Niger into pastoralists’ responses to climate change. It examined technical and institutional innovations developed by pastoralists to adapt to new conditions. It identified a wide range of technical and institutional innovations that pastoralists developed to adapt to new conditions, while seeking food security, sustainable resource management and improved governance within their socio-political units. Many of these innovations are related to maintaining mobility, an important basis for pastoralist resilience. Some innovations are location-specific and cannot be scaled up easily to other areas. However, they offer starting points for joint action by pastoralists, researchers, development agents and government authorities to support pastoralists’ efforts to deal with changing conditions.

The study revealed that pastoralists have considerable knowledge and experience in dealing with climatic variability, which can be expected to increase with climate change. However, various other factors, such as their marginalisation in decision-making about resource use, exert pressure on pastoralists and increase their vulnerability to climate change, as these pressures restrict their room to adapt. Local innovation in adaptation to climate change needs to be assessed also in the light of these other economic and socio-political pressures.

The focus in pastoralist development should be not so much on specific innovations, but rather on recognising local innovation as a process and stimulating its continuation, in interaction with other stakeholders. Local adaptive capacities can be strengthened through joint experimentation, investigation and action led by the pastoralists themselves, including action to address the pressures coming before climate change.

By Ericksen, P., Thornton, P.K., Ayantunde, A., Herrero, M., Said, M., de Leeuw, J.

Managing climate variability and climate risk is at the heart of pastoralism. The consequences and implications of climate change are therefore of paramount importance to pastoral livelihoods, productions systems and landscapes. This paper explores what we do and don’t know about how climate change will unfold in pastoral areas of sub-Saharan Africa. We first review pastoral climate risk management strategies in a changing economic and political context. Second we present downscaled climate projections out to 2050, under several different scenarios of temperature increase. The interpretation of as well as the uncertainties in these projections will be explained. Thirdly we present evidence on how climate change might affect pastoral systems through changes in vegetation, frequency of drought, and livelihood transitions in marginal cropping areas. A number of unanswered questions will also be raised to point out key gaps in knowledge. The final section will discuss the importance of adaptation strategies at local as well as higher governance levels to the ultimate future consequences and implications of climate change for the future of pastoralism
P. Ericksen, J. de Leeuw, P. Thornton, A. Ayantunde, M. Said, M. Herrero and A. Notenbaert

The Future of Pastoralism in the Sahel Zone of West Africa: Climate Change: Impacts & Consequencies on Pastoralism

By Mohammed Ibrahim Bare

This paper seeks to examine the challenges of climate change on pastoralism, considering its far-reaching impact and consequences. Over the years or decades, climate change has adversely affected the lives of millions of nomadic pastoralists and semi-nomadic pastoralists as well as those sedentary groups that benefit from the sector. The deterioration of the global weather conditions occasioned by severe drought and desert advancement which is attributed to trends in greenhouse gas emissions are the key driving factors that resulted in discouraging and frustrating pastoralism or pastoral activities in the Sudano-sahelian zone, unless adaptive strategies are taken to address the situation.
By Yohannes GebreMichael, Saidou Magagi, Wolfgang Bayer, and Ann Waters-Bayer

 

An exploratory study was made in Ethiopia and Niger into pastoralists? responses to climate change. It identified a wide range of technical and institutional innovations that pastoralists developed to adapt to new conditions, while seeking food security, sustainable resource management and improved governance within their socio-political units. Many of these innovations are related to maintaining mobility, an important basis for pastoralist resilience. Some innovations are location-specific and cannot be scaled up easily to other areas. However, they offer starting points for joint action by pastoralists, researchers, development agents and government authorities to support pastoralists? efforts to deal with change.

The study revealed that pastoralists have considerable knowledge and experience in dealing with climatic variability, which can be expected to increase with climate change. However, various other factors, such as their marginalisation in decision-making about resource use, exert pressure on pastoralists and increase their vulnerability to climate change, as these pressures restrict their room to adapt. Local innovation in adaptation to climate change needs to be assessed also in the light of these other economic and socio-political pressures.

The focus in pastoralist development should be not so much on specific innovations, but rather on recognising local innovation as a process and stimulating its continuation, in interaction with other stakeholders. Local adaptive capacities can be reinforced through joint experimentation, investigation and action led by the pastoralists themselves, including action to address the pressures coming before climate change.

P. Ericksen, J. de Leeuw, P. Thornton, A. Ayantunde, M. Said, M. Herrero and A. Notenbaert International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya and Bamako, Mali

Introduction Managing climate variability and climate risk is at the heart of pastoralism. Both traditional nomadic or mobile pastoralism and mixed or agro-pastoral systems have been supreme adaptations to cycles of drought, floods and “normal” rainfall years, most often in areas that do not receive more than 600 mm rainfall annually and more often make do with 200 to 300 mm. Pastoral herders balance herd size, species and breed composition, grazing patterns as well as other livelihood options with an eye to managing climatic risk, even if other risks such as social, economic or conflict are more immediate. Decisions to crop in wet years or areas are also in part influenced by climate variability. The consequences and implications of 21st century global warming and the resulting changes in climatic patterns that will occur are therefore of paramount importance to pastoral livelihoods, productions systems and landscapes. Adaptation choices made now will have implications for the coming decades, as climate change unfolds and pastoral communities continue to transform.
Held at Fairview Hotel, Nairobi, 30th September 2010 DRAFT REPORT By Hellen Osiolo, KIPPRA and Rocío Hiraldo, IDS

Lars Otto Naess Research Fellow Climate Change and Development Centre, Institute of Development Studies

Roundtable meeting, Fairview Hotel, Nairobi, 30 September 2010

Ghion Hotel, Addis Ababa, 11 November 2010 DRAFT REPORT By Alemtsehay Aberra and Rocío Hiraldo

Presented by Eng. Omedi Moses Jura

Ministry of environment and Mineral Resources

Harun Warui and Kennedy Were Environmental Research Programme/Climate Change Unit Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI)

Paul M. GuthigaKIPPRA

Roundtable meeting on policy processes on climate change and agriculture

30 September 2010 -Fairview Hotel, Nairobi

Fikadu Getachew (Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR)/Melkassa Agricultural Research Centre (MARC)) Presented at: Climate change, agriculture and policy processes in Ethiopia: A Roundtable Discussion Ghion Hotel, Addis Ababa 11 November 2010 Climate change, agriculture and policy processes in Ethiopia: A Roundtable Discussion, Ghion Hotel, Addis Ababa 11 November 2010
Berhanu Adenew (Senior Research Fellow, Ethiopian Economics Association) Climate Change and Policy Process in Ethiopia A Roundtable Discussion, Presented at: Climate change, agriculture and policy processes in Ethiopia: A Roundtable Discussion Ghion Hotel, Addis Ababa 11 November 2010 Climate change, agriculture and policy processes in Ethiopia: A Roundtable Discussion, Ghion Hotel, Addis Ababa 11 November 2010

From the Presentation at the “Ideas Marketplace”, Agriculture and Rural Development Day, COP-16, Cancun (December 2010)

Key messages:

Competing narratives can generate conflicting objectives for adaptation in the agricultural sector Identifying policy spaces requires unpacking of narratives, actors and networks Policy engagement may involve forging consensus among unlikely actors and creating suitable informal spaces

Dekha Sheikh and Corinne Valdivia

Climate Variability, Location and Diversification: Livestock Assets in Consumption Smoothing in Shock and Non-shock Seasons in two Regions of Kenya This study focuses on the coping strategies developed by households in five Kenyan villages, experiencing different climate effects of ENSO in 1998-99, and assesses the consumption smoothing roles played by large and small animals and other strategies through non shock and shock agricultural seasons, using both quantitative analysis and participatory approaches. Our approach builds on past versions of the permanent income hypothesis model that incorporated household characteristics and assets to explain the consumption behavior of households in contexts where incomplete markets exist. Our model incorporates livestock assets as a mechanism to approximate non-monetary savings not captured by the transitory income. The Tropical Livestock Units of large and small ruminants are incorporated to the model to evaluate their impact on consumption by type of liquid asset. Our paper determines whether farm households smooth their consumption in the short term as predicted by the model and we assess whether the model helps to explain consumption smoothing in the different seasons (two seasons of ENSO and three of drought between 1994 and 1999) for the same farm households, and whether ownership of assets (large and small ruminants) play a role as a risk reducing strategy and thus affect the consumption-smoothing behavior of farm households. The vulnerability of communities and individuals was measured through the development of a Food Security Index that measures coping strategies in times of shock. Shock events in the 1990s and coping strategies were identified and ranked by groups in the community. This ranking was used to measure an individual household’s food security index. In the process, monetary and non-monetary coping strategies were identified. The use of non-monetary, as well as both short and long-term coping strategies were characteristic of the semi-arid, mixed crop-livestock farming system of Machakos district. The coping strategies and Food Security Index analysis show that both sites at Machakos are more food insecure and hence vulnerable to climatic stress. Proxies to capture non-monetary strategies are proposed.

Conference Call

24th—28th May 2010

Egerton University Njoro, Kenya T

he Climate Change Adaptation in Africa (CCAA) announces the 2010 conference call at Egerton University, Njoro, Kenya. The conference will involve plenary sessions, with presentations from renowned international scientists on topics covering recent advances in knowledge on climate change adaptation in the dry lands. Other events include roundtable discussions involving the scientific community and representatives of agencies working with pastoral communities as well as members of vulnerable communities in the dry lands.

  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »