LDPI Working Papers

ldpi-logoThe Land Deal Politics Initiative provides a global platform to generate solid evidence on the ‘global land grab’ phenomenon through detailed, field-based research.

The LDPI Working Paper Series is the main initial publication outlet of the research outputs from the initiative. Many have been written through support from the LDPI’s Small Grants Programme.

Future Agricultures also publishes its own series of papers on a variety of themes: see the main Working Papers collection.


Latest articles

Subaltern Voices and Corporate/State Land Grab in the Save Valley
May 3, 2013 / LDPI Working Papers

Full title: “I Would Rather Have My Land Back”: Subaltern Voices and Corporate/State Land Grab in the Save Valley

LDPI Working Paper 20
E. Kushinga Makombe

Land Grabbing along Livestock Migration Routes in Gadarif State, Sudan
May 3, 2013 / LDPI Working Papers

Full title: Land Grabbing along Livestock Migration Routes in Gadarif State, Sudan: Impacts on Pastoralism and the Environment

LDPI Working Paper 19
Hussein M. Sulieman

Rural Land Expropriation for “Large-Scale” Commercial Farming in Rural China
May 3, 2013 / LDPI Working Papers

Full title: Upheaval in Chinese Villages: A Case Study of Rural Land Expropriation for “Large-Scale” Commercial Farming in Rural China

LDPI Working Paper 18
Kan Liu

Consolidating land, consolidating control: state-facilitated ‘agricultural investment’
May 3, 2013 / LDPI Working Papers

Full title: Consolidating land, consolidating control: state-facilitated ‘agricultural investment’ through the ‘Green Revolution’ in Rwanda

LDPI Working Paper 16
Chris Huggins

 

Urbanization strategies and domestic land grabbing in China: the case of Chongming Island
May 3, 2013 / LDPI Working Papers

Full title: The social and environmental implications of urbanization strategies and domestic land grabbing in China: The case of Chongming Island

LDPI Working Paper 14
Giuseppina Siciliano

Implications of Land Acquisitions for Indigenous Local Communities in Benishangul-Gumuz, Ethiopia
May 3, 2013 / LDPI Working Papers

Full title: Postponed Local Concerns? Implications of Land Acquisitions for Indigenous Local Communities in Benishangul-Gumuz Regional State, Ethiopia

LDPI Working Paper 13
by Tsegaye Moreda

Government and land corruption in Benin
December 7, 2012 / LDPI Working Papers

LDPI Working Paper 12
by Sèdagban Hygin F. Kakai

This paper tries to explain the land problem in terms of the corruption of the urban elites, the policy brokers and, more generally, the players in the political arena. Indeed, in the context of democratising African States such as Benin, corruption has become a social phenomenon, as has the exercise of political power. There is almost no political system that is free from corruption scandals, where the economy in general and the rural economy in particular has not been pillaged. Land corruption is equally well organised in the corridors of power at local, intermediate and central level. Indeed we could talk about a ‘chain of corruption’ for land. From the viewpoint of public action, this paper offers an empirical definition of land corruption and a typology of players. It studies the major trends and the critical uncertainties surrounding this phenomenon, i.e. using land as an object of political clientelism. It also explores the future prospects for land in the face of land corruption, and the possible mechanisms for escaping the crisis.

The mining-conservation nexus: Rio Tinto, development ‘gifts’ and contested compensation
December 7, 2012 / LDPI Working Papers

Full title: The mining-conservation nexus: Rio Tinto, development ‘gifts’ and contested compensation in Madagascar

LDPI Working Paper 11
by Caroline Seagle

his paper traces a genealogy of land access and legitimisation strategies culminating in the recent convergence of multinational mining and conservation in southeast Madagascar. Drawing on empirical research carried out on the Rio Tinto/QMM ilmenite mine in Fort Dauphin, it focuses on how local Malagasy land users are incorporated into new forms of inclusion (into the neoliberal capitalist economy) and exclusion (from land-based, subsistence activities) resulting from private sector engagement in conservation. Various material impacts of the mine were inverted and remediated to global audiences as necessary to sustainable development and biodiversity conservation. By financing, partnering with and participating in the same land access markets as international conservation NGOs, and setting aside small ‘conservation enclaves’ in each mining site, Rio Tinto/QMM legitimise mining in situ despite the negative socio-environmental consequences for the Malagasy. Mining–conservation partnerships may fail to adequately address — and ultimately exclude — the needs of people affected by the mines.