Seasonality Revisited

Conference-Logo---finalThe Seasonality Revisited International Conference, was held at the Institute of Development Studies from 8-10 July 2009, concluded that the costs of ignoring the seasonal dimensions of poverty are enormous, despite seasonality being rarely reflected in agricultural investment and social protection policies.

The conference was organised by the Future Agricultures Consortium and the Centre for Social Protection to help put the ‘seasonality of poverty’ back in the policy agenda.


Latest articles

Loevinsohn 2009 – Seasonal hunger, famine and HIV in Malawi
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Secure access to food, adequate in quantity and quality, is becoming increasingly problematic for many. The number of food insecure is rising worldwide, reaching more than 1 billion according to the latest estimate (FAO 2009). Falling incomes, in part due

Mukherjee 2009 – Seasonality and coping in Asia
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
The paper is based on 6 case studies in seasonal poverty, vulnerability and ill-being and coping mechanisms of poor farmers and agriculture labourers from 6 Asian developing countries –BANGLADESH, CAMBODIA, CHINA, INDIA, LAO PDR and NEPAL. The paper draws upon

Ndirangu 2009a – Seasonality, savings and health in Kenya
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
The high prevalence of risks in low-income economies implies that people’s ability to manage uncertainty is critical for both productivity and their mere survival. This paper analyses seasonal changes in per capita consumption and saving behaviour of farm households in

Ndirangu 2009b – Seasonal time poverty in Kenya
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Despite early recognition of the importance of time poverty in people’s well-being, its empirical investigation and measurement in the literature remains scarce. This paper applies the concepts used in consumption and income poverty to time use to estimate seasonal time

Neogi 2009 – Rice and Monga in Bangladesh
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
A series of experiments was conducted at the proposed RDRS University Campus Farm, Rangpur Bangladesh during aman season in 2005 and 2006. The overall objective was to evaluate the effect of direct seeding and transplanting system of short duration variety

Oluwatayo 2009 – Seasonal vulnerability of farmers in Nigeria
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Over the past two or three decades, it has become increasingly clear that small-scale farmers in sub-Saharan Africa produce the bulk of the food consumed by inhabitants of these countries, in spite of their poor working conditions in terms of

Press Release – Seasonality Revisted
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
‘Seasonal poverty’ is worsening. Climate Change, AIDS and heightened vulnerability identified as main culprits.

Rethman 2009 – Modelling Seasonality
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
This paper illustrates the use of models to analyse income seasonality. Section 1, by Charles Rethman is based on grouped data obtained using the household economy approach. Section 2, by John Seaman provides a more detailed analysis based on income

Salahuddin 2009 – Addressing Monga in Bangladesh
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Monga, is a well-known in the language of development in Bangladesh. Poor farmers and labourers in the northwest region of Bangladesh suffer from a lack of employment opportunities during the months of September to November. Such a situation increases the

Seasonal Neglect? Aseasonality in Agricultural Project Design
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Seasonal Neglect? Aseasonality in Agricultural Project Design Based on a literature review and observation of selected agricultural projects, this paper reflects on whether and how projects that support agriculture-based livelihoods in Africa account for seasonality in their design, delivery and