Seasonality Revisited

Conference-Logo---finalThe Seasonality Revisited International Conference, was held at the Institute of Development Studies from 8-10 July 2009, concluded that the costs of ignoring the seasonal dimensions of poverty are enormous, despite seasonality being rarely reflected in agricultural investment and social protection policies.

The conference was organised by the Future Agricultures Consortium and the Centre for Social Protection to help put the ‘seasonality of poverty’ back in the policy agenda.


Latest articles

Climate Variability, Location and Diversification: Livestock Assets in Consumption Smooth
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Dekha Sheikh and Corinne Valdivia Climate Variability, Location and Diversification: Livestock Assets in Consumption Smoothing in Shock and Non-shock Seasons in two Regions of Kenya This study focuses on the coping strategies developed by households in five Kenyan villages, experiencing

Coulter – Water-Bound Geographies of Seasonality
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Water-Bound Geographies of Seasonality: Investigating Seasonality, Water, and Wealth in Ethiopia through the Household Water Economy Approach The Household Water Economy Approach (HWEA) is a new approach that was designed in 2007-08 to bring analytical rigour to understanding the inter-linkages

Ding 2009 – Seasonality and labour migration in China
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Seasonal variation in agricultural and rural economy is a fundamental phenomenon characterising rural development in China. Socioeconomic consequences of seasonal patterns of household income, consumption and labour mobility need to be understood for designing appropriate interventions to smooth seasonality and

Dorward 2009 – Participatory budgets in Ghana and Zimbabwe
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
This paper describes the findings of research that aimed to 1) understand the constraints faced by farmers during production seasons and 2) evaluate the usefulness of a novel participatory method for exploring farming practices and resource use with farmers. Detailed

Freeland 2009 – Seasonality and social protection
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Hundreds of millions of people suffer an annual cycle of hunger and hardship that is linked to the agricultural season. There is a growing argument that it should theoretically be possible to design social protection measures that are counter-cyclical such

Gillespie 2009 – Seasonality of HIV and hunger in southern Africa
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
The seasonality of disease, ill-health and hunger were illustrated in multiple contexts in the original IDS conference on seasonality over three decades ago. The subsequent book (Chambers et al. 1981) was published in the same year as the first case

Hadley – Seasonality and Access to Education
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Seasonality and Access to Education: A Review of Research Improved education is associated with higher socio-economic status, lower fertility rates, improved health, reduced mortality rates and greater gender equality and mobility. Investment in primary education is especially crucial, as it

Hauenstein Swan 2009 – Interventions to address seasonal hunger
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
Many policies have proved to be successful in fighting seasonal hunger. In this paper, we review what we regard as the most important of these policy ideas and give examples of their application in various countries, focusing particularly on Malawi.Emergency

Jennings 2009 – What happened to the seasons
September 15, 2010 / Seasonality Revisited - Background Report and Papers
The timing of rains, and intra-seasonal rainfall patterns, are critical to smallholder farmers in developing countries. Seasonality influences farmer’s decisions about when to cultivate and sow and harvest, and ultimately the success or failure of their crops. Worryingly, therefore, farmers