You are here: Home Publications Publication by theme Land
Land
Search Keyword:
Total: 29 results found.
Tag: Land
Commercialisation of Land and ‘Land Grabbing‘: project overview

The project Commercialisation of Land and ‘Land Grabbing‘: Implications for Land Rights and Livelihoods in Southern Africa investigates the multiple pressures towards the commercialisation of land in Southern Africa - part of a phenomenon that has accelerated since the ‘food price crisis’ of 2007-2008.

It will provide grounded evidence on how deals are structured, how people respond to them, and the adequacy of existing land rights to protect local people.

Read more

Delegates discuss global land grabbing

Plenary presentations and delegate reflections on global land grabs.

Read more

Conference Background
Co-organized and hosted by the Future Agricultures Consortium in partnership with the Journal of Peasant Studies and the Land Deal Politics Initiative (LDPI). This international academic conference on ‘Global Land Grabbing’ will be held on 6-8 April 2011 at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

The focus of the conference will be on the politics of global land grabbing and agrarian change. Papers are expected to address some of the most urgent and strategic questions around global land grab.

Read more

Media Coverage
Press release and other media coverage

Read more

Biofuels: living up to expectations?

Have biofuel projects taken off as expected? A report from the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) looks at the situation in five countries which were seen as key destinations for the industry – and what effects the developments may have on local food security.

The authors, Anna Locke and Giles Henley, are participants in our project on China and Brazil in African Agriculture.

Following the rise in oil prices in 2007-2008, interest in biofuels led to the acquisition of large tracts of land in developing countries, including in Africa. There is concern that local food security may be threatened, but others argue that biofuel demand could stimulate investment in agriculture.

Read more

G8 & Africa: reframing the New Alliance

Through the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition, G8 countries are seeking to mobilise the private sector and multi-national corporations to boost African agriculture.

A new Future Agricultures / PLAAS briefing (pdf) looks at how African countries are engaging with the New Alliance.

Read more

Tags:
Displacement and changing labour in Zimbabwe's farms

Zimbabwe's recent land reform had a major impact on farm labour, with much displacement of workers from large-scale commercial farms. However, the scale and implications of this are much disputed and poorly understood. A new paper by Walter Chambati examines the issue with detailed research from Goromonzi district.

Agrarian Labour Relations in Zimbabwe after Over a Decade of Land and Agrarian Reform (pdf) Blog: Ian Scoones: The new farm workers: Changing agrarian labour dynamics following land reform in Zimbabwe

Read more

Blogs: "Land laundering" and global governance

In the run up to the Second International Conference on Land Grabbing, two speakers have blogged on different aspects of the rush for land.

Teo Ballvé writes about how violent paramilitaries have stolen land in Colombia and then 'laundered' it under the guise of grassroots development projects, and Matias Margulis documents the rise of global land governance, and asks whether it can learn from past efforts.

Teo Ballvé's blog on "Land laundering" Matias Margulis on global land governance

Read more

Tags:
Corporate land grabs: new journal issue

Future Agricultures researchers have contributed to an issue of the Journal of Peasant Studies on large land deals. 'The new enclosures' examines the implications of large-scale 'land grabs' for property, labour and rights.

Estimates of the total area of large land deals worldwide range from 43 million hectares (World Bank 2010) to 227m hectares (Oxfam 2011). Large land deals are often shrouded in secrecy, and often the full impact on local people is only felt after many years.

View the issue

Read more

The slippery nature of water grabbing

Large-scale land acquisitions for agricultural investment, popularly known as 'land grabbing', have recently attracted headline attention.  But the implications of these land grabs for water resources have stayed out of the spotlight until now.

A special issue of the journal Water Alternatives, with a focus on water grabbing, contains 14 new articles which draw on case studies from around the globe, including Sub-Saharan Africa.

Read more

Tags:
Colloquium on Land Grabbing, 11 June 2012
The 4th Critical Agrarian Studies Colloquium has taken place in The Hague, Netherlands.

After a few years dominated by important reports on land grabbing from NGOs and the media, as well as initial scoping studies from some academics, the year 2012 sees a number of fresh academic studies on the subject.

Photos, slides and other materials from the colloquium dealing with these themes will be available soon.

Read more

Tags:
"Green Grabs" journal issue

A special issue of the Journal of Peasant Studies, published this week, explores the controversial issue of 'green grabbing' – the appropriation of land and resources for environmental ends.

The vigorous debate on 'land grabbing' already highlights instances where 'green' credentials are called upon to justify appropriations of land for food or fuel – as where large tracts of land are acquired not just for 'more efficient farming' or 'food security’, but also to 'alleviate pressure on forests'.

Read more

Land in Zimbabwe: Voices from the Field

26 September 2011 - Ian Scoones

Zimbabwe's political crisis continues with political parties' internal divides exposed by Wikileaks revelations, the coalition government at loggerheads on fundamental issues and the prospect of a violent election period in the coming year. Yet with the stabilisation of the currency and the overhaul of some key economic policies, the agricultural economy in particular has begun to recover. IDS research has been tracking what has been happening in one province since 2000, looking at the changing livelihood prospects of those who gained land in Zimbabwe’s controversial 'fast track' land reform programme.

Today a series of short films are released which provide insights into what is happening on the ground, by offering some voices from the field. Following an overview film, each of the films in the series provides a profile of a particular farm family, exploring how they have invested in the land and their visions for the future. The films are accompanied by two booklets which offer a summary of the wider research findings published in the book Zimbabwe's Land Reform: Myths and Realities.

Read more

Country Case Studies: Transnational Commercial Land Deals in Africa

The convergence of global crises in food, energy, finance and the environment has driven a dramatic revaluation of land ownership as powerful transnational and national economic actors tap into lands outside their own borders to provide food and energy security at home. This is occurring globally, but there is a clear North-South dynamic that echoes the historical land grabs that underwrote both colonialism and imperialism. In addition, however, there is an emerging ‘North-South-South’ dynamic in the recent global land grab, with economically powerful non-Northern countries getting significantly involved. The lands of the Global South are increasingly perceived as sources of alternative energy (primarily biofuels), food crops, mineral deposits (new and old) and reservoirs of environmental services.

The pace and extent of these land deals has been rapid and widespread. The phrase ‘global land grab’ has become a catch-all phrase to describe and analyze the current explosion of (trans) national commercial land transactions. Around the world, various state, corporate and civil society groups have reacted, albeit in different ways. Some see this as a major threat to the lives and livelihoods of the rural poor worldwide, and so opposes such commercial land deals. Others see economic opportunity for the rural poor, although they are wary of corruption and negative consequences, and so calls for the improving land market governance feature prominently. And, of course, between these two extremes for and against large scale land purchases/sales are a range of intermediate positions offered by other groups.

Read more

FAC's focus on Land Grabbing
Much attention has recently fallen on the ‘scramble’ for land and other natural resources in Africa to secure food supplies for populous Asian countries concerned about long-term food security. Yet mounting evidence (from the World Bank, from the International Land Coalition and Oakland Institute among others) suggests that at least as significant is the demand for land on which to grow biofuels or agrofuels. Also significant is the demand for forests and for land for mining. Many of the transnational land deals being concluded in Africa are therefore not about cultivation of food at all, let alone cultivation of food for Africa.

Although the trend towards transnational commercial land deals is global, most estimates and research data concur that most of the land being transacted is in Africa: 70% (about 32 million ha) according to the World Bank and 64% (about 51 million ha) according to the International Land Coalition. As well as Asian, European and North American investors are those from Latin America and from Africa itself, not least South Africa.

In 2010 the Future Agricultures Consortium responded to growing evidence of large-scale land deals in Africa by pursuing two research initiatives:

Read more

Tags:
FAC presents at FAO Food Security World Committee session

FAC presented its land research at a FAO Food Security World Committee session together with other research on key 'land grab' issues to show how these issues are linked to government policies, like 'Responsible Agricultural Investment' (RAI) during a Transnational Institute side event to the Rome summit.

Read more

Tags:
Land grabbing in Africa

The FAC land theme contributed to an event at the FAO in Rome in advance of the critical debate by the FAO World Food Security Committee session on land grabbing. Hosted by civil society organisations, including the Transnational Institute and the IPC on Food Sovereignty, the event attracted a large standing-room only crowd. FAC land theme convenor, Ruth Hall, talked about the land grabbing context in Africa, while Ian Scoones offered an overview of land and agrarian issues in the biofuel sector, as well as commenting on the World Bank report, Investing in Land. UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, Olivier de Schutter, also spoke along with representatives from IFAD and FAO. The discussions at the event are feeding into on-going deliberations around the FAO’s guidelines on land and tenure, and in particular into the lobbying efforts of civil society organisations and social movements.

Read more

Tags:
LDPI Small Grant Recipients - 2010

The Land Deal Politics Initiative (LDPI) is a network initiated by five university-based research institutions with the purpose of promoting 'engaged research' on the recent explosion of (trans) national commercial and corporation-driven land transactions. In-depth and systematic enquiry has become urgent and necessary in order to have deeper, meaningful and productive debates around this issue.

Read more

Tags:
Linking to Lands Deals Politics Initiative (LDPI)

The FAC research theme will be linked to the international Land Deals Politics Initiative (LDPI), launched in January 2010.

The objective of this initiative is to provide a platform and network to generate solid evidence through detailed, field-based research that incorporates and complements a range of policy-oriented donor and NGO-led reviews, as well as more activist political work. {jathumbnail off}

Read more

Tags: