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Tag: Irrigation
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Creating New Markets via Smallholder Irrigation: The Case of Irrigation-led Smallholder...
(Working Papers)

Creating New Markets via Smallholder Irrigation: The Case of Irrigation-led Smallholder Commercialization in Lume District, Ethiopia

By Samuel Gebreselassie June 2010

Following the 2008 global food crises, the agricultural development agenda has gained renewed international attention. Though this observed price instability reflects largely short-term disequilibria between supply and demand, many - especially major food importing countries - consider it an indicator of a new era that is characterised by much more unstable food prices on the international markets (Galtier, 2009). Consequently, investors from these countries were encouraged to lease farm lands in relatively land and water abundant countries in Africa and other parts of the developing world.

Economics of Small-Scale Pump Irrigation, Somali Region, Ethiopia
(Posters)

Gezu Bekele, Alison Napier, Andy CatleyFeinstein International Center, Tufts University, Addis Ababa

Impact AssessmentIn 2010 an assessment was conducted to assess the impact of an NGO project that provided water pumps, fuel and other assistance to ‘Asset Building Groups’ (ABGs) in Gode, Kelafoand Mustahilzones, Somali Region, Ethiopia. Assessment questions included an economic evaluation of household-level benefits and costs, and constraints and opportunities of the approach.

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Pastoralists and irrigation in the Horn of Africa: Time for a rethink?
(Conference Papers)

By Stephen Sandford

There is much land in pastoral areas of the Horn of Africa that could be converted to irrigated agriculture and thus provide an alternative or additional livelihood for pastoralists. There is a long history of successful indigenous irrigation in the Horn of Africa but interventions by outsiders to involve pastoralists in irrigation in the last sixty years have largely failed. The causes for failure vary but are largely known. Many people experienced in pastoral development oppose further support by outsiders for the development of irrigation by pastoralists. This opposition ignores changes in the factors which caused past failure and in the demand for irrigation now. These changes are reviewed and attention drawn to the survival of past failures and the continuing expansion of the area of irrigation involving pastoralists. The key issues in further expansion are discussed.

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Pastoralists and irrigation. Time for a rethink?
(Abstracts)

 By Stephen Sanford

There is much land in pastoral areas of the Horn of Africa that could be converted to irrigated agriculture and thus provide an alternative or additional livelihood for pastoralists. There is a long history of successful indigenous irrigation in the Horn but interventions by outsiders to involve pastoralists in irrigation in the last sixty years have largely failed. The causes for failure vary but are largely known. Many people experienced in pastoral development oppose further support by outsiders for the development of irrigation by pastoralists. This opposition ignores changes in the factors which caused past failure and in the demand for irrigation now. These changes are reviewed and attention drawn to the survival of past failures and the continuing expansion of the area of irrigation involving pastoralists. The key issues in further expansion are discussed.

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The Politics of Small-Scale Irrigation in Tanzania: Making Sense of Failed Expectations
(Working Papers)

Future Agricultures Working Paper 107Anna Mdee with Elizabeth Harrison, Chris Mdee, Erast Mdee and Elias Bahati September 2014

This working paper examines the dynamics of smallscale irrigation in two sites in Tanzania. It is an output from a wider project which explores how institutions for smallscale irrigation combine localised moral economies with national and international influences. The project seeks to understand how ‘external’ actors interact with ‘local’ norms, rules, moralities and politics, particularly in the context of climate change. It further asks how economic growth objectives can be reconciled with strengthened livelihoods and the resilience of diverse stakeholders.

The two study locations illuminate different aspects of the policy context for irrigation in Tanzania, where agriculture continues to provide employment for more than 80 percent of the population, but productivity remains poor and livelihoods are highly vulnerable. The latest policy initiatives aimed at developing agriculture such as Kilimo Kwanza suggest a significant role for irrigation in improving the productivity of agriculture, and will be crucial in attempts at commercialisation and growth.

Tanzanian irrigation policy shows a clear preference for the creation of large irrigation schemes to be managed by the private sector or by co-operatives of small farmers. ‘Traditional’ irrigation is only seen as desirable where it is ‘improved’ and formalised to fit within existing institutions of water management. To explore this policy context further, the study covers one location where irrigation is informal and ‘traditional’ but apparently improved by a change in technology, and one large irrigation scheme managed by a co-operative of small-scale farmers.

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The stabilising effect of irrigation on seasonal consumption: evidence from Andhra Pradesh
(Day 2)
The stabilising effect of irrigation on seasonal consumption: evidence from Andhra Pradesh Edoardo Masset July 2009
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