Themes

Future Agricultures explores what needs to be done to get different forms of agriculture – food/cash crops, livestock/pastoralism, smallholdings/contract farming/large holdings – moving on a track of increasing productivity and competitiveness.

We do this through work in 10 themes, examining how agricultural policy is made and put into practice in different settings, and how this could be improved


Latest articles

Does the ‘heifer-in-trust’ model work for social protection?
Does the ‘heifer-in-trust’ model work for social protection?
April 26, 2013 / Growth and Social Protection
An article in Development Policy Review by James Sumberg and Gountiéni Damien Lankoandé examines the ‘heifer-in-trust’ or ‘livestock-in-kind credit’ model through a social-protection lens. Specifically it seeks to engage with debates about the use of asset-based strategies to support graduation

Special issue: Governing global land deals
Special issue: Governing global land deals
April 22, 2013 / Land
A special issue of the journal Development and Change, entitled Governing Global Land Deals: The Role of the State in the Rush for Land, is the latest of a series exploring global land, water and green grabs. This has been

Land guidelines: from paper to practice
Land guidelines: from paper to practice
April 3, 2013 / Land
The tenth "Policies against Hunger" conference in June 2013 will centre around the question of how to apply the standards and principles described in the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the

The problem with profit
The problem with profit
March 27, 2013 / China and Brazil in African Agriculture
In a new post on the blog From Poverty To Power, Henry Tugendhat examines DFID’s policy of working with private investors to invest in developing economies. What can the UK learn from Chinese and Brazilian experiences in Africa? As new

China and Brazil in Africa: new papers
China and Brazil in Africa: new papers
March 11, 2013 / China and Brazil in African Agriculture
A set of seven new working papers looks at how Brazil and China are changing agricultural development in Africa. The China and Brazil in African Agriculture (CBAA) project analyses new patterns of development co-operation in Ethiopia, Ghana, Mozambique and Zimbabwe.

New book sheds light on Ethiopian seed systems
New book sheds light on Ethiopian seed systems
March 6, 2013 / Science, Technology and Innovation
A new book, available as a free download (Zip file, 18MB), is the culmination of a considerable amount of new and important research on seed systems, both within Ethiopia and across Africa. Defining Moments in the Ethiopian Seed System draws

Media competition: Winners announced
Media competition: Winners announced
February 27, 2013 / Policy Processes
We're delighted to announce the winners of our Africa-wide journalism competition on the politics and processes that influence agricultural investment in Africa. The winners are: Print category: Oluyinka Alawode (Nigeria) Audio category: George Kalungwe (Malawi) We had over 40 submissions

Pastoralism book launch, Kenya: video & audio
Pastoralism book launch, Kenya: video & audio
February 18, 2013 / Pastoralism
The book Pastoralism and Development in Africa: Dynamic Change at the Margins had its Kenya launch in Nairobi on 13 February 2013. The keynote speaker was Hon. Mohamed Elmi, Minister of State for Development of Northern Kenya and Other Arid

Busting myths about youth and agriculture
Busting myths about youth and agriculture
February 14, 2013 / Young People & Agrifood
The debate on youth and agriculture has often assumed that simply encouraging young people to farm will solve the triple problem of unemployment, undernutrition and an ageing workforce. But the attitudes of young people themselves have largely been ignored, as

Are agricultural ‘success stories’ all they appear to be?
Are agricultural ‘success stories’ all they appear to be?
February 13, 2013 / Science, Technology and Innovation
Demonstrating 'impact' has become a strong imperative for those involved in agricultural research. But this pressure has led to some large-scale claims for techniques that have only been tested at farm level. In a new blog post, Jim Sumberg examines